Scuba Diving With Q – A Very Twitchy Shark At Camel Cove Queensland #ScubaDive #ScubaDiving

Scuba Diving With Q – A Very Twitchy Shark At Camel Cove Queensland #ScubaDive #ScubaDiving


Hey people of the interwebs it is Q with another scuba diving adventure. Saturday morning 7 o’clock and it’s 24 degrees outside already, expecting to get up to 30 today, which is not too bad, it has been hotter recently. But summer is definitely kicking in, in the land down under. It’s a little bit overcast and we are expecting some showers but the good news is there’s no electrical activity associated with this at the moment, but there might be a chance of a storm late this afternoon. But we’ll be well out of the water by then. Once I get down to the coast, I’m going to do a quick run around of the dive spots and see what’s available to us. I believe Kings Beach is going to be more likely, but it’s possible that Shelly Beach could be open too. So it all depends on the wind direction. Then I’ll hook up with my dive Buddy Gordon and we’ll see whoever else turns up to go and blow some bubbles. It’s too bloody hot! That’s better! Joining me on the dive today was my dive Buddy Gordon and Chris and also Steve and Lee. However it was that hot that Steve and Lee had gone ahead of us and got themselves into the water to cool down. Chris had driven up from Brisbane and hadn’t dived this site before, so Gordon was just filling him in on some of the idiosyncrasies of the site and in particular how slippy the rocks are that we have to walk across to get into our entry point. As you can see here, I’m taking very small baby steps, because I never know what I’m gonna be standing on next. Even though this dive site is an extension of Kings Beach boat ramp, we call it Camel Cove, because you’ve gotta hump your gear to the dive entry point and it’s quite a little trip over rocks and it can get quite warm if you’ve got a big thick wet suit on. On this day the surface conditions were perfect. Very flat, very calm, very small waves breaking across the rocks, but on days when the waves are breaking over the rocks a lot harder here, we have to get to the very edge and then throw ourselves backwards over the back end of a wave as it comes in. There are other videos in my collection here where you can see us doing that. But on this day it was perfect and it was a case of just laying back into the water and getting our fins on and swimming out to join Steve and Lee who were chilling out quite nicely around about 10 or 20 meters off the rocks. Even though the surface conditions were perfect there was a little bit of disappointment as I dropped down and noted that the visibility was around about the 4 meter mark, which is about 13 feet. We dropped into 4.4 meters water which is 14.5 feet and once we hit the deck and checked everyone was okay dive lead Steve gave us a heading and we went off in search of adventure. Steve being the dive lead usually got to see things first and he attracted my attention by using his torch. As I swam over and looked at where Steve was pointing, I really couldn’t see what I was looking at at first. I didn’t know how big or small the item was and then I spotted it! A nice big Wobbegong and I could see right away that this Wobbegong was a little bit twitchy. Not as calm and relaxed as the other Wobbegongs I filmed in this location. And after a few seconds of letting us check him out, he decided he’d had enough and he was off and gone. It’s interesting to note that as the Wobbegong moves off the Fusiliers are chasing after him to see if there’s any scraps of food that might be available. Looking back at where the shark was, you can see the sediments being stirred up and all the Fusiliers or goat fish as we call them, come in to see if there’s anything to eat. I’m also liking the long trailing edge of these fusiliers tails. As well as big marine life there was little marine life. Here’s a beautiful sea star. I actually put this one high up in my top five of sea stars, for no particular reason I just like the way it looks. We also came across quite a few nudibranchs. Here we can see two of the white species, the name is on the screen, I’m not going to try and pronounce it. And it’s possible that they were getting together for mating purposes, which a lot of marine creatures are doing right now as the water temperature starts to head in the upward direction. Here’s the same species of Nudibranch, but you can get a better look at it here, laid out without any weed covering it over. This Nudibranch was a lot broader than the others and I did have a look on the website nudibranch.com.au to see if I could find the name of this one but it eluded me. Further into the dive hiding amongst the seaweed, we came across three painted crays. Now these are not the sharpest tools in the shed and they were in holes that were not big enough to hide them, so as we crowded around they got very skittish and one in particular decided he’d had enough and was heading off. Here’s a slow-mo to give you a better idea. And you’ll hear me laughing because as he darted off it went and slammed into Lee, realized it wasn’t going anywhere, did a complete 180 and shot off past Steve. These things can move really fast when they need to. The painted crays were out in force this day and all of them seemed to be having the same problem of finding a hole big enough for them to hide in. As we came towards the end of this dive Steve the dive leader was just asking the buddies to check on each other’s air and make sure that we had enough to get back to our exit poin, which was Kings Beach boat ramp. Our total dive time was 52 minutes. Our maximum depth was7.6 meters which is 25 feet. The water temperature was a very comfortable 26 degrees celsius which is 78.8 Fahrenheit. The vis on average was about 4 meters or 13 feet and I think everyone had a really good dive, which is verified by listening to the comments of Chris and Lee and Gordon at the end of this video. If you enjoyed this scuba diving adventure with Q and you’d like to see some more, please subscribe to the YouTube channel, leave a like on the video as you do like, and leave your comments. As soon as I see those I’ll get back to you. Also if you want to join me on a dive, just hit me up on either youtube or facebook and we can sort something out. Thanks for watching and take it easy. How was that Chris? Very nice indeed. Yeah, let’s go back and do it again. How was that? Fantastic. Yeah. Yeah very tropical. Coming back for more? Yeah! 26 degrees, nice little surge, heaps of crays! The crays were nuts weren’t they! And the big Nudibranchs they were great. Shame we can’t take those crays with us! GPS… haha… Tag ’em. Mr G it was all good? Yeah, I like the swell, it was like just surfing, scuba surfing, I’m not sure if that’s a thing. Yeah, yeah!

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